Latest & greatest articles for alopecia

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Top results for alopecia

1. Variant PADI3 in Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Variant PADI3 in Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common form of scarring alopecia among women of African ancestry. The disease is occasionally observed to affect women in families in a manner that suggests an autosomal dominant trait and usually manifests clinically after intense hair grooming. We sought to determine whether there exists a genetic basis of CCCA and, if so, what it is.We used exome sequencing in a group (...) of women with alopecia (discovery set), compared the results with those in a public repository, and applied other filtering criteria to identify candidate genes. We then performed direct sequencing to identify disease-associated DNA variations and RNA sequencing, protein modeling, immunofluorescence staining, immunoblotting, and an enzymatic assay to evaluate the consequences of potential etiologic mutations. We used a replication set that consisted of women with CCCA to confirm the data obtained

2019 NEJM

2. Alopecia

, producing circular areas of loss. Total loss of scalp hair ( alopecia totalis) or scalp (...) and body hair ( alopecia universalis) occurs less commonly. The exact cause of alopecia areata is unknown. Alopecia areata is a relatively common condition. It has been estimated that it affects 15 people in 10,000 of the UK population. It can present at any age but 60% of people develop their first bald patch before 20 years of age. The progress of alopecia areata is unpredictable. Patchy alopecia areata (...) involving less than 40% of the scalp is usually self-limiting and regrowth can be expected within 2014 2. Interventions for alopecia areata. BACKGROUND: Alopecia areata is a disorder in which there is loss of hair causing patches of baldness but with no scarring of the affected area. It can affect the entire scalp ( alopecia totalis) or cause loss of all body hair ( alopecia universalis). It is a relatively common condition affecting 0.15% of the population. Although in many cases it can be a self

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

3. Alopecia

Alopecia Evidence Maps - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4

2018 Trip Evidence Maps

4. Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata Evidence Maps - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4

2018 Trip Evidence Maps

5. Review of quality of life studies in women with alopecia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Review of quality of life studies in women with alopecia Alopecia is a dermatologic condition that affects the pilosebaceous unit in both men and women. In addition to a thorough medical history and physical examination, a host of diagnostic tools may be warranted to differentiate nonscarring and scarring alopecias. Female pattern hair loss represents the most common form of hair loss experienced by up to 40% of women by a certain age. Although alopecia is a benign disorder, even the most (...) negligible amount of hair loss can be devastating to a patient's self-esteem, self-image, and overall quality of life. We present this comprehensive review of quality of life studies in women with alopecia to describe the multitude of feelings and emotions associated with the disorder and remind dermatologists of the psychological impact it can have on women.

2018 International journal of women's dermatology

6. Androgenic alopecia

Androgenic alopecia Androgenic alopecia - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Androgenic alopecia Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Also known as pattern baldness, androgenic alopecia is a genetically determined, patterned, progressive loss of hair from the scalp and occurs in both men and women. Both androgens and genetics play a role in its pathogenesis. The term androgenic (...) alopecia is best used only when referring to male-pattern hair loss, as most females likely do not share the androgenic pathway. A more appropriate term for women is female-pattern hair loss. The term pattern hair loss will be used when referring to hair loss affecting both sexes. Men present with hair thinning in the temporal areas that advances to the crown (vertex) area as the alopecia progresses. Women usually have more diffuse thinning on the crown area, and less commonly present with a male-type

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Alopecia, androgenetic - male

Alopecia, androgenetic - male Alopecia, androgenetic - male - NICE CKS Share Alopecia, androgenetic - male: Summary Androgenetic alopecia describes a distinctive pattern of hair loss, which may occur in genetically predisposed men and is thought to be androgen dependent. In men, hair loss usually initially involves the front and sides of the scalp and progresses towards the back of the head. The underlying pathological process involves pigmented terminal hairs gradually being replaced (...) years of age, it affects about a third of white men. This increases to around 80% in men older than 70 years of age. Complications of androgenetic alopecia include adverse psychosocial effects. Hair loss progresses over time in untreated men. The rate of progression is unpredictable and some men eventually lose almost all of the scalp hairs, while others retain a considerable number particularly in the occipital and parietal areas above the ears. The diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia is usually

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata Alopecia areata - NICE CKS Share Alopecia areata: Summary Alopecia areata is a chronic, inflammatory condition affecting the hair follicles which leads to sudden onset of non-scarring alopecia (hair loss where the hair follicles are generally preserved). Any hair-bearing skin can be involved, but it most commonly affects the scalp or beard and, less frequently, the eyebrows and eyelashes. Total loss of scalp hair (alopecia totalis) or scalp and body hair (alopecia universalis (...) ) is rare. Nail changes are seen in 10–15% of people. Alopecia areata occurs when hairs are prematurely converted from the growth (anagen) to the loss (telogen) phase, but the exact cause is unknown. Alopecia areata is a relatively common condition and is estimated to affect 15 in 10,000 people in the UK. It can present at any age, and males and females are affected equally. The prognosis of alopecia areata is unpredictable. Spontaneous remission within one year may be seen in up to 80% of people

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

9. Quality of life in mild and severe alopecia areata patients Full Text available with Trip Pro

Quality of life in mild and severe alopecia areata patients Alopecia areata is a relapsing hair disorder characterized by a sudden hairloss and has a considerable impact on patient's quality of life. The goal of this study was to determine quality of life among patients with mild and severe forms of alopecia areata and compare the two groups.During one year, 176 patients (96 mild, 80 severe) were selected and asked to complete Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaires.Our study (...) confirms that alopecia areata considerably impacts quality of life and this is more pronounced in patients with severe disease and those who had acute stress recently.

2017 International journal of women's dermatology

10. Brazilian Experience of the Treatment of Alopecia Universalis with the Novel Antirheumatic Therapy Tofacitinib: A Case Series Full Text available with Trip Pro

Brazilian Experience of the Treatment of Alopecia Universalis with the Novel Antirheumatic Therapy Tofacitinib: A Case Series Alopecia universalis is an autoimmune disorder for which there is no known effective therapy. Tofacitinib-a novel antirheumatic therapy for rheumatoid arthritis-has been shown in some reports to induce sustained hair growth in patients with alopecia universalis.Here, we review the experiences of four different rheumatologists across the country regarding four Brazilian (...) patients with alopecia universalis who were treated with tofacitinib . Two of these four patients had idiopathic alopecia and the other two had rheumatoid arthritis; in each case, the alopecia universalis was apparently induced by etanercept.Tofacitinib should be considered for the treatment of severe alopecia areata, but the optimal dose and duration of therapy should be defined in randomized controlled trials.

2017 Rheumatology and therapy

11. Hormonal therapy in female pattern hair loss Full Text available with Trip Pro

loss is the most common cause of hair loss in women and one of the most common problems seen by dermatologists. This hair loss is a nonscarring alopecia in which loss occurs on the vertex scalp, generally sparing the frontal hairline. Hair loss can have significant psychosocial effects on patients, and treatment can be long and difficult. The influence of hormones on the pathogenesis of female pattern hair loss is not entirely known. The purpose of this paper is to review physiology and potential (...) Hormonal therapy in female pattern hair loss 28492055 2018 11 13 2352-6475 3 1 2017 Mar International journal of women's dermatology Int J Womens Dermatol Hormonal therapy in female pattern hair loss. 53-57 10.1016/j.ijwd.2017.01.001 Brough Kevin R KR Department of Dermatology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Torgerson Rochelle R RR Department of Dermatology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. eng Journal Article Review 2017 02 24 Netherlands Int J Womens Dermatol 101654170 2352-6475 Female pattern hair

2017 International journal of women's dermatology

12. Effect of a Scalp Cooling Device on Alopecia in Women Undergoing Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: The SCALP Randomized Clinical Trial. (Abstract)

primary efficacy end points were successful hair preservation assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 scale (grade 0 [no hair loss] or grade 1 [<50% hair loss not requiring a wig] were considered to have hair preservation) at the end of 4 cycles of chemotherapy by a clinician unaware of treatment assignment, and device safety. Secondary end points included wig use and scores on the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (...) ; 54 adverse events were reported in the cooling group, all grades 1 and 2. There were no serious adverse device events.Among women with stage I to II breast cancer receiving chemotherapy with a taxane, anthracycline, or both, those who underwent scalp cooling were significantly more likely to have less than 50% hair loss after the fourth chemotherapy cycle compared with those who received no scalp cooling. Further research is needed to assess longer-term efficacy and adverse

2017 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

13. Association Between Use of a Scalp Cooling Device and Alopecia After Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association Between Use of a Scalp Cooling Device and Alopecia After Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a common and distressing adverse effect. In previous studies of scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia, conclusions have been limited.To evaluate whether use of a scalp cooling system is associated with a lower amount of hair loss among women receiving specific chemotherapy regimens for early-stage breast cancer and to assess related changes (...) months). No participants in the scalp cooling group received anthracyclines. Hair loss of 50% or less (Dean score of 0-2) was seen in 67 of 101 patients (66.3%; 95% CI, 56.2%-75.4%) evaluable for alopecia in the scalp cooling group vs 0 of 16 patients (0%) in the control group (P < .001). Three of 5 quality-of-life measures were significantly better 1 month after the end of chemotherapy in the scalp cooling group. Of patients who underwent scalp cooling, 27.3% (95% CI, 18.0%-36.6%) reported feeling

2017 JAMA

14. Androgenetic Alopecia

their teens. Deep frontal recession and/or vertex balding may also start shortly after puberty although in most men the onset is later. About 50-60% of men are affected by the age of 50 increasing to about 80% by the age of 70 and beyond (4, 5). Hair loss progresses to a bald scalp (Norwood-Hamilton VI/VII) in 50-60% of men by the age of 70 (5). The prevalence of androgenetic alopecia is reportedly lower and its severity less among Asians, Native Americans and African-Americans compared to the European (...) , Belgium 9 Department of Dermatology, University of Bologna, Italy 10 Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Division of Evidence based Medicine, Charité – Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany ABSTRACT Androgenetic alopecia is the most common hair loss disorder, affecting both men and women. Initial signs of androgenetic alopecia usually develop during teenage years leading to progressive hair loss with a pattern distribution. Moreover, its frequency increases with age and affects up to 80% Caucasian

2017 European Dermatology Forum

15. Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata Alopecia areata - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Alopecia areata Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2017 Summary Autoimmune disease that targets the hair follicle. Characterised by sudden onset of patchy hair loss. Diagnosis is clinical. Characteristic physical findings are exclamation mark hairs (short, broken hairs) and a positive pull test. A scalp biopsy shows (...) perifollicular inflammation. Topical or intralesional corticosteroids are appropriate for patients with limited hair loss. Skin atrophy can be a temporary side effect. Definition Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease that affects almost 2% of the population in the US. Safavi KH, Muller SA, Suman VJ, et al. Incidence of alopecia areata in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1975 through 1989. Mayo Clin Proc. 1995;70:628-633. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7791384?tool=bestpractice.com Inflammatory cells

2017 BMJ Best Practice

20. Risk of erectile dysfunction associated with use of 5-α reductase inhibitors for benign prostatic hyperplasia or alopecia: population based studies using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Risk of erectile dysfunction associated with use of 5-α reductase inhibitors for benign prostatic hyperplasia or alopecia: population based studies using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink.  To estimate the risk of erectile dysfunction in men who used 5-α reductase inhibitors to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia or alopecia. Cohort studies with nested case-control analyses. UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Two populations of men free of risk factors for erectile dysfunction (...) and other sexual dysfunction or its treatment: men aged 40 or more with benign prostatic hyperplasia who received a prescription for a 5-α reductase inhibitor (finasteride or dutasteride) or α blocker, or both, and men aged 18-59 with alopecia. In the benign prostatic hyperplasia study, exposures were classified as 5-α reductase inhibitors only, 5-α reductase inhibitors+α blockers, or α blockers only. In the alopecia study, exposures were finasteride 1 mg or no treatment. Cases were men with a diagnosis

2016 BMJ